Framing the Face

Dr Jennifer Evans is Senior Lecturer in History at the University of Hertfordshire. She is the author of Aphrodisiacs, Fertility and Medicine in Early Modern England (Boydell & Brewer, 2014) and numerous articles on the early modern history of gender and body. In 2014 she co-founded the Perceptions of Pregnancy research network with Dr Ciara Meehan.

In her contribution to the Research Exchange, she reflects on her new collection, co-edited with Dr Alun Withey, New Perspectives on the History of Facial Hair: Framing the Face, which was published by Palgrave Macmillan in 2018.

Suicide and the Fear of Flogging

Alyson Brown is Professor of History at Edgehill University. She is the author of English Society and the Prison: Time, Culture and Politics in the Development of the Modern Prison, 1850-1920 (Boydell & Brewer, 2003) and numerous articles on prison history.

In her contribution to the Research Exchange, she discusses the debate around flogging prompted by a prison suicide mentioned in her recent article in the Social History Society’s journal, ‘The Sad Demise of z.D.H.38 Ernest Collins: Suicide, Informers and the Debate on the Abolition of Flogging’, Cultural & Social History, vol. 15, no.1 (2018), pp. 99-114.

Counterfeit Virginity

Stephanie Allen is a PhD student at the University of Hertfordshire, having previously studied at Northampton and Exeter Universities. She is currently working on her doctoral thesis, which is entitled ‘Deceitful Bodies: The performance and physicality of bodily fraud in early modern England c1540-1750.’

In her contribution for the Research Exchange, she discusses the work on early modern recreated virginity which she presented at the 2018 Social History Society conference, where she won the prize for best postgraduate paper.

Changing Burial Practices

Dr Julie Rugg is Senior Research Fellow in the Centre for Housing Policy and a member of the Cemetery Research Group at the University of York. She is the author of ‘Churchyard and Cemetery: Tradition and Modernity in Rural North Yorkshire’ (Manchester University Press, 2013) as well as numerous articles, books and reports on housing and burial history and policy.

In her contribution to the Research Exchange, she reflects on how turning her attention from the history of urban to rural burial practices led her to rethink some old narratives of change over the past couple of centuries, as she explores further in her recent article ‘Consolation, Individuation and Consumption: Towards A Theory of Cyclicality in English Funerary Practice’, Cultural & Social History, vol. 15, no. 1 (2018), pp. 61-78.

Long Before the “Boob Job”

Dr Kim Phillips is Associate Professor of History at the University of Auckland, New Zealand. Her work on medieval European societies focuses on the two themes of medieval women, gender and sexuality, and the representation of foreign lands and peoples. She is the author of ‘Before Orientalism: Asian Peoples and Cultures in European Travel Writing, 1245-1510’ (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2014).

In her contribution for the Research Exchange, Dr Phillips reflects on the themes she explores in her latest article ‘The Breasts of Virgins: Sexual Reputation and Young Women’s Bodies in Medieval Culture and Society’, Cultural & Social History, vol. 15, no. 1 (2018), pp. 1-18.

Divided Kingdom

Pat Thane is Research Professor in Contemporary British History at King’s College London and the Honorary President of the Social History Society. She is a leading authority on the political, social and welfare history of modern Britain. Amongst her many publications are ‘The Foundations of the Welfare State’ (Longman, 1996) and ‘Old Age in English History: Past Experiences, Present Issues’ (Oxford University Press, 2000).

In her contribution to the Research Exchange, she reflects on how she came to settle on the key themes for her new survey of twentieth-century Britain’s social and political history ‘Divided Kingdom: A History of Britain, 1900 to the Present’, published by Cambridge University Press in August 2018.

The Sacred Home

Mary Laven is Professor of Early Modern History at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of Jesus College. She is a social and cultural historian of early modern Italy and Europe, with particular interests in religion, gender, sociability, and material culture. She is the author of ‘Virgins of Venice: Enclosed Lives and Broken Vows in the Renaissance Convent’ (Viking Penguin, 2002) and ‘Mission to China: Matteo Ricci and the Jesuit Encounter with the East’ (Faber and Faber, 2011).

In her contribution to the Research Exchange, she reflects on the challenges of writing the social history of the Renaissance and the benefits of collaborative research. Her new book ‘The Sacred Home in Renaissance Italy’ was co-written with Abigail Brundin and Deborah Howard and published in July 2018 by Oxford University Press.

‘Those Vagabond Quakers’

Dr David Hitchcock is a Senior Lecturer in History at Canterbury Christ Church University. He is the author of ‘Vagrancy in English Culture and Society, 1650-1750’ (Bloomsbury, 2016) and is currently working on a second book, a history of ‘ending’ poverty in the British Atlantic world, c. 1600-1848.

In his contribution for the Research Exchange, he reflects on how the academic kindness of his PhD supervisor, Bernard Capp, led to his recent article in the Social History Society’s journal ‘He is the Vagabond without habitation in the Lord’: The Representation of Quakerism as Vagrancy in Protectorate England, 1650-1660′, Cultural and Social History, vol. 15, no. 1 (2018), pp. 21-37.

Image: ‘Quaker Meeting in London: A female Quaker preaches’ engraving by Bernard Picard (c.1723)

Early Modern Siblings

Bernard Capp is Emeritus Professor of History at the University of Warwick. He is a leading authority on everyday life in early modern England, having written books on the family, gender, radical movements in the English Revolution, the impact of puritan rule during the interregnum, astrological almanacs, popular literature, and the Cromwellian navy.

In his contribution for the Research Exchange, he reflects on the subject of early modern siblinghood at the publication of his new book ‘The Ties that Bind: Siblings, Family, and Society in Early Modern England’ (published by Oxford University Press on 12 July 2018).

Histories of the Self

Penny Summerfield is Emeritus Professor of Modern History at the University of Manchester and Honorary Vice-President of the Social History Society. Her work on the Second World War has been hugely influential both in relation to how oral histories are used and the wider historical scholarship around the formation of gender identities.

To coincide with the publication of her new book, ‘Histories of the Self: personal narratives and historical practice’ (published by Routledge on 12 July 2018), she’s been in conversation with the Social History Exchange editor about this new book and how it fits into her wider body of work.