Venice’s Secret Service: Organizing Intelligence in the Renaissance

Dr Ionanna Iordanou, Oxford Brookes University @IoannaIordanou   According to conventional wisdom, systematised intelligence and espionage are ‘modern’ phenomena, spanning  from the eve of the First World War to the present. Venice’s Secret Service overturns this academic orthodoxy, recounting the arresting story of one of the world’s earliest centrally organised state intelligence organisations. Headquartered in … Continued

Women and the formation of transatlantic Quakerism

Dr Naomi Pullin, University of Warwick naomi.pullin@warwick.ac.uk     In Female Friends and the Making of Transatlantic Quakerism, 1650-1750 I provide the first in-depth exploration of British and colonial Quaker women over the movement’s first century. The central question informing my research is how Quakerism’s transition from a radical sect to a settled church altered … Continued

Public Secrets: Race and colour in colonial and independent Jamaica

Prof Henrice Altink, Department of History, University of York henrice.altink@york.ac.uk @HenriceAltink   It was on my first visit to Jamaica as a PhD student in the 1990s that I noticed the importance of race and colour in Jamaican society. When I went to the bank to cash some travellers’ cheques, I noticed that the doorman … Continued

Cheap Street: markets and cabbages

Dr Victoria Kelley, University for the Creative Arts vkelley@uca.ac.uk   Cheap Street tells the story of London’s street markets: Petticoat Lane, Berwick Street, Lambeth Walk and many others. From the 1850s, anything that could be bought in a shop could also be bought in the street markets – they were the butcher, baker, greengrocer, provision … Continued

Researching the Ragged Schools

Dr Laura Mair is REF Impact Officer for the School of Divinity at the University of Edinburgh. Alongside completing her doctoral research on the ragged school movement, in 2015-16 she acted as research consultant to the Victoria and Albert Museum’s Museum of Childhood for their ‘On Their Own’ exhibition on British child migrants.

In her contribution to the Research, she reflects on her experience of researching the intimate history of children’s and adult’s lives in the Victorian ragged schools, which is the subject of her new book ‘Religion and Relationships in Ragged Schools: An Intimate History of Educating the Poor, 1844-1870’, which is published by Routledge.

How Animals Shaped Georgian London

Dr Thomas Almeroth-Williams is a Research Associate of the University of York’s Centre for Eighteenth Century Studies and a Research Communications Manager at the University of Cambridge. In addition to human–animal interactions, his main interests lie in urban life and the world of work in Georgian Britain.

In his contribution to the Research Exchange, he discusses his hope of bringing animal history firmly into the realm of social history with his new book ‘City of Beasts: How animals shaped Georgian London’ (Manchester University Press, 2019).

Courtship in the Eighteenth Century

Dr Sally Holloway is Vice Chancellor’s Research Fellow in History & History of Art at Oxford Brookes University. With Stephanie Downes and Sarah Randles, she is the co-editor of ‘Feeling Things: Objects and Emotions through History’ (Oxford University Press, 2018).

In her contribution to the Research Exchange, she uses the eighteenth-century courtship of Elizabeth Jeffreys and Charles Pratt to illustrate the key themes of her new book, ‘The Game of Love in Georgian England: Courtship, Emotions, and Material Culture’ (Oxford University Press, 2019).

Rebuilding Britain’s Blitzed Cities

Dr Catherine Flinn is Associate Lecturer at Oxford Brookes University, where she completed a PhD in modern British history in 2012. Her background prior to the doctorate was in architecture, planning and the historic built environment. Her current research focuses on postwar reconstruction, in particular the political, economic and cultural impacts on rebuilding and redevelopment.

Her contribution to the Research Exchange coincides with the launch of her book, ‘Rebuilding Britain’s Blitzed Cities: Hopeful Dreams, Stark Realities’ which is published by Bloomsbury and will be launched at Churchill College, Cambridge, on 1 May 2019.

Reading for Masculinity in Iranian Primary Sources

Dr Sivan Balslev is Lecturer in Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. She is interested in the social, cultural, and gender history of modern Iran and has published two Hebrew translations of poet Forough Farrokhzad’s books, ‘Another Birth’ and ‘Let Us Believe in the Beginning of the Cold Season’. 

In her contribution to the Research Exchange, she gives a taste of the range of sources she used to seek out largely unspoken attitudes and practices that made up the history of Iranian masculinity for her doctoral research and her new book ‘Iranian Masculinities: Gender and Sexuality in Late Qajar and Early Pahlavi Iran’ (Cambridge University Press, 2019).

War and Childhood

Dr Mischa Honeck and Dr James Marten are co-editors of ‘War and Childhood in the Era of the Two World Wars’, an new edited volume published by Cambridge University Press. In their contribution to the Research Exchange, they reflect on the young lives and uncomfortable realities featured in this collection, which complicates the standard equation of childhood and victimhood in times of war.

Dr Mischa Honeck teaches US and transatlantic history at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin.  He was a research fellow at the German Historical Institute in Washington, DC, and is the author of Our Frontier Is the World: The Boy Scouts in the Age of American Ascendancy (Cornell University Press, 2018).

Dr James Marten is Chair of History at Marquette University, Wisconsin, and a leading authority in both the history of the US Civil War and the history of childhood, whose books include ‘The Children’s Civil War’ (University of North Carolina Press, 1998).