Turning a 13C Jewish Manuscript into Public History through Comics

Kremena Dimitrova, University of Portsmouth @KremieDimitrova This blog by Kremena Dimitrova was commended in the 2020 SHS Postgraduate Prize. At the end of 2019, I was commissioned by Professor Alex Samely and Dr Stefania Silvestri to work on the 50 Jewish Objects project. The commission involved researching and visually investigating, employing a graphic narrative format, … Continued

‘All her copies’: The will of Anne Boler as evidence for her career as a Stationer

Joseph Saunders, University of Glasgow j.saunders.1@research.gla.ac.uk @joe_saunders1  This blog was commended in the 2020 SHS Postgraduate Prize. In her will of 1638 Anne, widow of James Boler bequeathed her husband’s estate to her children with ‘such increases and improvements’ as she had made. James had been a bookseller and member of the Company of Stationers, … Continued

Unopened Letters, and the Secrets Within

Ellen Smith, University of Leicester ecss3@leicester.ac.uk @EllenCSSmith We are pleased to share this blog by Ellen Smith, runner up in the 2020 SHS Postgraduate Prize. Several times during my research project, on family life in British India during the long nineteenth century, I have reflected on how privileged I am to read, almost daily, personal … Continued

Holocaust Remembrance from ‘a practical point of view’: James Parkes, the Parkes Institute, and Public History

Dr Chad McDonald, University of Southampton c.d.mcdonald@soton.ac.uk @Chad_McDonald In this blogpost, Dr Chad McDonald discusses the work that led to him winning the inaugural Pamela Cox Public History Prize. He focuses on his travelling exhibition, James Parkes and the Age of Intolerance, whilst also reflecting on his social media and school outreach activities. On 27 April … Continued

Making a stand with Mary: Precarious Employment in Pandemic Times

Kate Brooks, Bath Spa University K.Brooks@bathspa.ac.uk We are pleased to share this blog by Kate Brooks, the winner of the 2020 SHS Postgraduate Prize. In 1851, Joseph Lowe was working as a barber in Willenhall, Staffordshire, with four children and a house servant named Jane. Willenhall was an overcrowded, impoverished district, known for locksmithery and … Continued

SHS Book Prize Runner Up: The Social History of Trust in the Middle Ages

Professor Ian Forrest, University of Oxford ian.forrest@oriel.ox.ac.uk We are delighted to share this blog about Ian Forrest’s Trustworthy Men: How Inequality and Faith Made the Medieval Church (Princeton University Press, 2018), the runner-up of the 2020 SHS book prize. No-one had really noticed the ‘trustworthy men’, but as I pondered this medieval administrative term I … Continued