The Social History Society’s Book Prize recognises innovative scholarship the fields of social and cultural history.

It is awarded by a panel of judges, who look for the best original work of historical research published in the preceding calendar year. The only stipulations are that the book must be written in English, by a scholar normally resident in the UK, and must be at least the author’s second history book. Books are nominated by publishers.

 

2021 Prize

WINNER: Lucy Bland for Britain’s Brown Babies: The stories of children born to black GIs and white women in the Second World War (Manchester University Press, 2019)

COMMENDATION: John Henderson for Florence under Siege: Surviving Plague in an Early Modern City (Yale University Press, 2019)

COMMENDATION: Suzannah Lipscomb for The Voices of Nimes: Women, Sex and Marriage in Reformation Languedoc (Oxford University Press, 2019)

Find out more about the  2021 winners here

 

2020 Prize

WINNER: Khaled Fahmy for In Quest of Justice. Islamic Law and Forensic Medicine in Modern Egypt (University of California Press, 2018)

RUNNER UP: Ian Forrest for Trustworthy Men: How Inequality and Faith made the Medieval Church (Princeton University Press, 2018)

Find out more about the  2020 winners here

 

2019 Prize

WINNER: Hannah Barker for Family & Business during the Industrial Revolution (Oxford University Press, 2017)

RUNNER UP: Sabine Lee for Children Born of War in the Twentieth Century (Manchester University Press, 2017)

Find out more about the 2019 winners here

 

2018 Prize

WINNER: Sasha Handley for Sleep in Early Modern England (Yale University Press, 2016)

RUNNER UP: Jon Stobart and Mark Rothery for Consumption and the Country House by (Oxford University Press, 2016)

Find out more about the inaugural winners here