Holocaust Remembrance from ‘a practical point of view’: James Parkes, the Parkes Institute, and Public History

Dr Chad McDonald, University of Southampton c.d.mcdonald@soton.ac.uk @Chad_McDonald In this blogpost, Dr Chad McDonald discusses the work that led to him winning the inaugural Pamela Cox Public History Prize. He focuses on his travelling exhibition, James Parkes and the Age of Intolerance, whilst also reflecting on his social media and school outreach activities. On 27 April … Continued

The (32) Thousand Different Hands: Big Data and the “Poppy Volunteers” of Blood Swept Lands & Seas of Red (2014)

Dr Eleanor O’Keeffe, Historic Royal Palaces eleanor.okeeffe@hrp.org.uk @dr_okeeffe   As the UK mobilised a new volunteer effort to fight Covid-19, it felt timely to be working on a history that touched on contemporary volunteering in Britain. As many have reached to wartime analogies to match the sense of national crisis, it serves us well to … Continued

Legacy or Residue? Rethinking Imperial and Colonial History during a Racial Crisis

Weiao Xing, University of Cambridge @WeiaoX While statues are being discussed and changes blocked, black people have to pass them daily, seeing the congratulation of slave trading, their horror and pain.” Kate Williams, Professor of Public Engagement with History, University of Reading   In a long thread on Twitter, Kate Williams elucidated the convoluted (and … Continued

A Call to Knitting Needles

Dr Vivien Newman, First World War Women  @worldwarwomen On 20 April, The Shields Gazette reported that ‘residents are knitting hearts to cheer up patients being treated for coronavirus in intensive care’. This reminded me of knitting in World War One. In 1914, Secretary of State for War Lord Kitchener issued a Call to Knitting Needles. … Continued

We’ll meet again, but will we forget again?: Voluntarism in the Second World War and COVID-19.

Charlotte Tomlinson, University of Leeds C.h.tomlinson@leeds.ac.uk @charltommo Everywhere you look, it seems that discussions about COVID-19 are flooded with analogies of the Second World War. The language used to describe the pandemic, and particularly how society should respond to it, has made heavy use of allusions to the war through militarised language – NHS workers … Continued

Public History, Flu Pandemics and the Provincial Media in 1918 and 2020

Dr Andrew Jackson, Bishop Grosseteste University andrew.jackson@bishopg.ac.uk @mylocalpasts Some of those who trod the centenary-rich public-history trail through the years 2014-18, might feel that there is a sense of the past revisiting us in the present. Many of the features of the national crisis and emergency arrangements that established themselves during 1914-18 are being resurrected. … Continued

Tweeting like it’s 1819

John Evans, Free History Project @Live1819 I never expected to have Twitter followers joking that a project rooted firmly in the news of two centuries ago might in fact be parodying events in 2019. ‘Are you sure you are tweeting about 1819?’ asked one, during one of the many moments of acrimonious (probably Brexit) confrontation … Continued

She Wanted to See A Soldier

Dr David Clampin, Liverpool John Moores University @WWIIadvertising   A couple of years ago I was asked by the National Trust to work with them at their Formby Beach site. Formby beach is an important ecological site made up of ‘dramatic sand dunes, surrounded by sweeping coastal pinewoods’. It is well known locally, and beyond, … Continued