Get your skates on: the Victorian roller revolution

Kate Brooks, Bath Spa University K.Brooks@bathspa.ac.uk Our local parks and beauty spots may be busy during lockdown, but if you are a cool teenager who knows what TikTok is, you will probably be at a nearby  carpark – and on wheels. Since the first lockdown, TikTok and Instagram frequently feature roller skaters, wearing the more … Continued

‘Some choice directions’: Early modern suicide advice literature

Imogen Knox, University of Warwick @Imogen_Knox Society has long been troubled by the prevalence of suicide, with concerns around mental health rising through the COVID-19 pandemic. Late seventeenth- and early eighteenth-century England similarly believed itself to be facing the ‘prodigious frequency’ of ‘diabolical transports of despair, and self-murther’. The devil reaped ‘a plentiful (but most … Continued

Policing the Home Front, 1914-1918: The control of the British population at war.

Dr Mary Fraser, University of Strathclyde  drmaryfraser@aol.com @drmaryfraser https://writingpolicehistory.blogspot.com/   Writing the everyday lives of ordinary people How do you find out about the lives of ordinary people who lived in the past? What kind of evidence do we have? Diaries give detailed accounts of individuals, but not everybody wrote one, so they can only … Continued

Fighters across Frontiers: Transnational Resistance in Europe, 1936-1948

Prof. Robert Gildea, University of Oxford robert.gildea@history.ox.ac.uk ‘But there’s no such thing as transnational resistance!’ exclaimed one of our colleagues at the first meeting of the research team in Belgrade, ‘the Slovak national rising was a national rising!’ The point was well taken. After all, the team was drawn from many different nationalities: French, Dutch, … Continued

Debauched, Desparate, Deranged: Women who Killed

Prof. Carolyn Conley, The University of Alabama at Birmingham cconley@uab.edu   This book means a great deal to me in part because it was finished after I retired from teaching and moved to a city away from my life at the university. While I miss my students and colleagues, it was liberating to write for … Continued

Sympathy for the Robber: Stories of Crime in Early Modern England

Dr Lena Liapi, Keele University e.liapi@keele.ac.uk @LenaLiapi While doing research for my book on rogue pamphlets (narratives of criminals in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries), I came upon the case of James Turner. As a solicitor who had defrauded many of his clients, Turner was an unlikeable character. Even more egregiously, he betrayed a friend’s … Continued

Urban Allotments – historical havens during times of national crisis

JC Niala, University of Oxford Jc.niala@stcatz.ox.ac.uk @jcniala The significance of the allotment in urban English history is inconsistent. In general, the allotment space is treated as marginal, yet simultaneously they remain inextricably linked to popular imaginations of significant periods of history, such as the Second World War. This link resurfaced with COVID-19 and is reflected … Continued

‘Manifestations of Warmth’: Emotions in Trade Unions

Edda Nicolson, University of Wolverhampton @Edda_Nicolson This blog by Edda Nicolson was commended in the 2020 SHS Postgraduate Prize. ‘May I ask the delegate, if he has any charge to make against the Gasworkers’ Union, to make it definitely? At the present moment I am the Chairman of the whole of the organisations in this … Continued