Black Sailors and Legal History from the Bottom Up

Dr Michael A. Schoeppner is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Maine, Farmington. His research explores how the lived experience of race intersected with and informed legal culture and constitutional change in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

In his contribution to the Research Exchange, he reflects on the writing of his new book, ‘Moral Contagion: Black Atlantic Sailors, Citizenship, and Diplomacy in Antebellum America’ (Cambridge University Press, 2019), which was awarded the 2017 Hines Prize by the Carolina Lowcountry and Atlantic World program at the College of Charleston.

Rethinking Learie Constantine

Jeffrey Hill is an emeritus professor of historical and cultural studies at De Montfort University. He has written on various aspects of nineteenth and twentieth century popular culture, with a special emphasis in recent years on the study of sport and its ideological influences.

In his contribution to the Research Exchange, he discusses the need to tell the story of cricketing hero Learie Constantine with a new focus on race, Empire and the Commonwealth. ‘Learie Constantine and Race Relations in Britain and the Empire’ was published by Bloomsbury in December 2018.