Charity Entrepreneurs

Dr Sarah Roddy is Lecturer in Modern Irish History at the University of Manchester. She is the author of ‘Population, providence and empire: the churches and emigration from nineteenth-century Ireland’ (Manchester University Press, 2014).

In her contribution for the Research Exchange, she explains how innovative and competitive the fundraisers were that she researched for her new book with Julie-Marie Strange and Bertrand Taithe, ‘The Charity Market and Humanitarianism in Britain, 1870–1912’ (Bloomsbury, 2018).

Rethinking Learie Constantine

Jeffrey Hill is an emeritus professor of historical and cultural studies at De Montfort University. He has written on various aspects of nineteenth and twentieth century popular culture, with a special emphasis in recent years on the study of sport and its ideological influences.

In his contribution to the Research Exchange, he discusses the need to tell the story of cricketing hero Learie Constantine with a new focus on race, Empire and the Commonwealth. ‘Learie Constantine and Race Relations in Britain and the Empire’ was published by Bloomsbury in December 2018.

Immigrant Life in Medieval England

Dr Bart Lambert is Assistant Professor in Late Medieval Urban History and a member of the HOST research group at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium. His work focuses on migration flows and international trade in Europe between the fourteenth and sixteenth centuries.

In his contribution to the Research Exchange, he reflects on the life of Gervase de Vulre, one of those whose story was uncovered during his collaboration with Mark Ormrod and Jonathan Mackman, which led to the publication of their co-authored monograph ‘Immigrant England, 1300-1550’ with Manchester University Press in December 2018.

Emotions, Gender and Selfhood

Dr Laura Kounine is Lecturer in Early Modern History at the University of Sussex. She is the co-editor of ‘Cultures of Conflict and Resolution in Early Modern Europe’ (Ashgate, 2015), ‘Emotions in the History of Witchcraft’ (Palgrave, 2017) and the online platform ‘History of Emotions – Insights into Research’.

In her contribution to the Research Exchange, she explains why she wanted her new book – ‘Imagining the Witch: Emotions, Gender and Selfhood in Early Modern Germany’ (Oxford University Press, 2018) – to be less a history of accusations and executions, and more a history of resistance.

Exploring the Supernatural in WW1

Owen Davies is Professor of Social History at the University of Hertfordshire and a leading authority on the belief in witchcraft, magic, ghosts, and popular medicine from the ancient world to the modern era. He is the author of numerous books and articles, including Grimoires: A History of Magic Books (OUP, 2009) and America Bewitched: The Story of Witchcraft after Salem (OUP, 2013).

In his contribution to the Research Exchange, he reflects on how he came to write his new book, ‘A Supernatural War: Magic, Divination, and Faith during the First World War’, which was published by Oxford University Press in October 2018.

On White Fury

Christer Petley is Professor in History at the University of Southampton. His work focuses on the histories and legacies of slavery in the Americas, in particular slave societies and colonial settlers in the British Caribbean.

In his contribution to the Research Exchange, he reflects on his new book ‘White Fury: A Jamaican Slaveholder and the Age of Revolution’, which was published by Oxford University Press in October 2018.

Divided Kingdom

Pat Thane is Research Professor in Contemporary British History at King’s College London and the Honorary President of the Social History Society. She is a leading authority on the political, social and welfare history of modern Britain. Amongst her many publications are ‘The Foundations of the Welfare State’ (Longman, 1996) and ‘Old Age in English History: Past Experiences, Present Issues’ (Oxford University Press, 2000).

In her contribution to the Research Exchange, she reflects on how she came to settle on the key themes for her new survey of twentieth-century Britain’s social and political history ‘Divided Kingdom: A History of Britain, 1900 to the Present’, published by Cambridge University Press in August 2018.

The Sacred Home

Mary Laven is Professor of Early Modern History at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of Jesus College. She is a social and cultural historian of early modern Italy and Europe, with particular interests in religion, gender, sociability, and material culture. She is the author of ‘Virgins of Venice: Enclosed Lives and Broken Vows in the Renaissance Convent’ (Viking Penguin, 2002) and ‘Mission to China: Matteo Ricci and the Jesuit Encounter with the East’ (Faber and Faber, 2011).

In her contribution to the Research Exchange, she reflects on the challenges of writing the social history of the Renaissance and the benefits of collaborative research. Her new book ‘The Sacred Home in Renaissance Italy’ was co-written with Abigail Brundin and Deborah Howard and published in July 2018 by Oxford University Press.

Early Modern Siblings

Bernard Capp is Emeritus Professor of History at the University of Warwick. He is a leading authority on everyday life in early modern England, having written books on the family, gender, radical movements in the English Revolution, the impact of puritan rule during the interregnum, astrological almanacs, popular literature, and the Cromwellian navy.

In his contribution for the Research Exchange, he reflects on the subject of early modern siblinghood at the publication of his new book ‘The Ties that Bind: Siblings, Family, and Society in Early Modern England’ (published by Oxford University Press on 12 July 2018).

Histories of the Self

Penny Summerfield is Emeritus Professor of Modern History at the University of Manchester and Honorary Vice-President of the Social History Society. Her work on the Second World War has been hugely influential both in relation to how oral histories are used and the wider historical scholarship around the formation of gender identities.

To coincide with the publication of her new book, ‘Histories of the Self: personal narratives and historical practice’ (published by Routledge on 12 July 2018), she’s been in conversation with the Social History Exchange editor about this new book and how it fits into her wider body of work.