Children, Covid-19 and Parental Responsibility

Dr Deniz Arzuk, University College London @denizarzuk https://changingchildhoods.com/ On June 1st, after 10 weeks of lockdown, primary schools in England have reopened for children in Years 1, 6, and Reception. Yet, the initial reports suggest that turn-out is low, and parents are still unconvinced and hesitant to send their children back to school. This is … Continued

A Call to Knitting Needles

Dr Vivien Newman, First World War Women  @worldwarwomen On 20 April, The Shields Gazette reported that ‘residents are knitting hearts to cheer up patients being treated for coronavirus in intensive care’. This reminded me of knitting in World War One. In 1914, Secretary of State for War Lord Kitchener issued a Call to Knitting Needles. … Continued

The Holocaust, Refugee Children, and Canada’s National Narrative

In April 1947, the Canadian Jewish Congress (CJC) was authorized to bring 1000 young Holocaust survivors to Canada through the War Orphans Project. The Canadian federal government required all young newcomers to be placed in foster families. This led the CJC to set up a campaign to find potential foster parents. Bringing together scholarship on … Continued

Researching the Ragged Schools

Dr Laura Mair is REF Impact Officer for the School of Divinity at the University of Edinburgh. Alongside completing her doctoral research on the ragged school movement, in 2015-16 she acted as research consultant to the Victoria and Albert Museum’s Museum of Childhood for their ‘On Their Own’ exhibition on British child migrants.

In her contribution to the Research, she reflects on her experience of researching the intimate history of children’s and adult’s lives in the Victorian ragged schools, which is the subject of her new book ‘Religion and Relationships in Ragged Schools: An Intimate History of Educating the Poor, 1844-1870’, which is published by Routledge.

War and Childhood

Dr Mischa Honeck and Dr James Marten are co-editors of ‘War and Childhood in the Era of the Two World Wars’, an new edited volume published by Cambridge University Press. In their contribution to the Research Exchange, they reflect on the young lives and uncomfortable realities featured in this collection, which complicates the standard equation of childhood and victimhood in times of war.

Dr Mischa Honeck teaches US and transatlantic history at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin.  He was a research fellow at the German Historical Institute in Washington, DC, and is the author of Our Frontier Is the World: The Boy Scouts in the Age of American Ascendancy (Cornell University Press, 2018).

Dr James Marten is Chair of History at Marquette University, Wisconsin, and a leading authority in both the history of the US Civil War and the history of childhood, whose books include ‘The Children’s Civil War’ (University of North Carolina Press, 1998).

Early Modern Siblings

Bernard Capp is Emeritus Professor of History at the University of Warwick. He is a leading authority on everyday life in early modern England, having written books on the family, gender, radical movements in the English Revolution, the impact of puritan rule during the interregnum, astrological almanacs, popular literature, and the Cromwellian navy.

In his contribution for the Research Exchange, he reflects on the subject of early modern siblinghood at the publication of his new book ‘The Ties that Bind: Siblings, Family, and Society in Early Modern England’ (published by Oxford University Press on 12 July 2018).